Universal Journal of Psychology Vol. 1(3), pp. 114 - 120
DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2013.010305
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Pre-Operative Psychological Characteristics of Gastric Band and Gastric Bypass Patients


Maria E. Bleil1, Susan Labott2,*, Sarah R. Shelby2
1 Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

ABSTRACT

Weight loss outcomes vary among different bariatric procedures, and may be partially due to differences in patient characteristics that are present preoperatively. In an observational study, laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) and Roux-En-Y laparoscopic or open gastric bypass (RYGB) patients were compared on pre-op dimensions of depression, anxiety, and disordered eating. Results indicated that depression scores were in the mild range, and anxiety scores were in the mild range only for RYGB patients. In comparison to adults with eating disorders, scores on disordered eating scales were low. Cognitive-affective depression symptoms and several eating disorder subscale scores were higher in RYGB than in LAGB patients. This suggests that surgical candidates who choose RYGB surgery may differ psychologically from those who choose LAGB, although other factors impact choice of procedure also. Future research should delineate the decision-making process leading to the selection of a surgery type as well as the match of the patients to the demands of the post-op regimen.

KEYWORDS
Bariatric Surgery, Psychology, BDI, EDI

Cite This Paper in IEEE or APA Citation Styles
(a). IEEE Format:
[1] Maria E. Bleil , Susan Labott , Sarah R. Shelby , "Pre-Operative Psychological Characteristics of Gastric Band and Gastric Bypass Patients," Universal Journal of Psychology, Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 114 - 120, 2013. DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2013.010305.

(b). APA Format:
Maria E. Bleil , Susan Labott , Sarah R. Shelby (2013). Pre-Operative Psychological Characteristics of Gastric Band and Gastric Bypass Patients. Universal Journal of Psychology, 1(3), 114 - 120. DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2013.010305.