Linguistics and Literature Studies Vol. 1(2), pp. 118 - 121
DOI: 10.13189/lls.2013.010209
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The Social Power of Literature: How Could a Novel Resist to What is Wrong with a Culture?


Mario Francisco Benvenuto1, Rossella Michienzi2,*
1 University of Calabria (Italy), resident in Montalto Uffugo (Cs) 87040
2 Uviversity of Calabria (Italy), resident in Maierato (VV) 89843

ABSTRACT

This paper represents an attempt to describe the society of “norms” and ideals which lead to the destruction of the body. The Edible Woman by Margaret Atwood lends itself well to an exploration of this complex condition. This is particularly true if we consider the fact that Margaret Atwood writes about the female body in terms of the culture that determines it. Atwood’s female bodies tell the story of the subjects’ experience within a system that seeks to consume them. Susan Bordo finds Foucault’s model of self-surveillance useful for the analysis of femininity is reproduced through a process of self-normalization to cultural ideals of the perfect face or the perfect body. According to Susan Bordo anorexia must be defined within a cultural context. Bordo feels that it is through eating disorders that resistance to the dominant ideological system is made known. But at the same time this resistance also destroys the contemporary female body. In conclusion we could claim that body image is strongly influenced by social norms about physical beauty. We will see how the human body is introduced in a mechanism of power with a social basis, that explores it, breaks it down and rearranges it.

KEYWORDS
Social Power, Anorexia Nervosa, Dominant Ideological System

Cite This Paper in IEEE or APA Citation Styles
(a). IEEE Format:
[1] Mario Francisco Benvenuto , Rossella Michienzi , "The Social Power of Literature: How Could a Novel Resist to What is Wrong with a Culture?," Linguistics and Literature Studies, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 118 - 121, 2013. DOI: 10.13189/lls.2013.010209.

(b). APA Format:
Mario Francisco Benvenuto , Rossella Michienzi (2013). The Social Power of Literature: How Could a Novel Resist to What is Wrong with a Culture?. Linguistics and Literature Studies, 1(2), 118 - 121. DOI: 10.13189/lls.2013.010209.