Universal Journal of Psychology Vol. 3(6), pp. 176 - 184
DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2015.030604
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Carer Attachment Moderates Resilience for Young People Experiencing Psychosis or Depression


G. Sawle 1, C. J. Lennings 2,3,*, R. Heard 4
1 Private Practice, Australia
2 Clinical and Forensic Psychology Services, LSC Psychology, Australia
3 Police Academy, Charles Sturt University, Australia
4 Faculty of Health Sciences, Sydney University, Australia

ABSTRACT

This paper explored the transactional nature of carer attachment, proposing that carer insecure attachment may influence the development of psychopathology and resilience in Young People (YP) experiencing psychosis or depression. Seventy-five matched carer and YP dyads were grouped according to the YP diagnosis, psychosis forty-three and depression thirty-two. YP and carers completed an attachment protocol, Attachment Style Questionnaire and the YP's scores on the Ego-Resiliency Scale measured resilience. Diagnosis of Depression was associated with low YP resilience and high carer insecure (avoidant) attachment. Diagnosis of Psychosis was associated with high YP resilience and insecure (anxious) carer attachment. The results are plausibly explained by the type of carer insecure attachment combining with the YP's level of resilience to influence development of psychopathology in YP. If so, the assessment of carer attachment is likely to provide insights into the interpersonal transactions that influence resilience in YP experiencing Mental Health problems.

KEYWORDS
Attachment, First Episode Psychosis, Depression, Resilience

Cite This Paper in IEEE or APA Citation Styles
(a). IEEE Format:
[1] G. Sawle , C. J. Lennings , R. Heard , "Carer Attachment Moderates Resilience for Young People Experiencing Psychosis or Depression," Universal Journal of Psychology, Vol. 3, No. 6, pp. 176 - 184, 2015. DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2015.030604.

(b). APA Format:
G. Sawle , C. J. Lennings , R. Heard (2015). Carer Attachment Moderates Resilience for Young People Experiencing Psychosis or Depression. Universal Journal of Psychology, 3(6), 176 - 184. DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2015.030604.