Universal Journal of Psychology Vol. 2(4), pp. 131 - 135
DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2014.020401
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Age of Onset of Physical Abuse: Implications for Adult Anger and Aggression


Stephanie D. Carter 1,*, Niki L. Crabtree 2, James Epps 3, Ann-Marie Roberts-Davis 4
1 Department of Psychology, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901
2 Department of Education, University of South Florida
3 Department of Mental Health Law and Policy, University of South Florida
4 Private Practice in San Antonio, TX

ABSTRACT

This study examines the impact the age of onset of physical abuse has on the expression of anger and aggression in adulthood. The Emotional and Physical Abuse Questionnaire (EPAB), State Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), Emotional Response Scenarios (ERS), and a demographics questionnaire were given to 229 undergraduate psychology students. Age of onset of abuse does predict higher levels of Trait Angry Temperament and Anger Expression Out in those whose abuse began as a child than for those whose abuse began in adolescence/ adulthood or those not abused. Further, it was determined that Hostile Attributional Bias moderated the relationship between age of onset of abuse and both Trait Angry Temperament and Anger Expression Out. The implications for the Social Information Processing theory of anger and aggression and potential therapeutic use of these findings are discussed.

KEYWORDS
Childhood Physical Abuse, Child Maltreatment, Anger, Aggression, Attributed Hostility

Cite This Paper in IEEE or APA Citation Styles
(a). IEEE Format:
[1] Stephanie D. Carter , Niki L. Crabtree , James Epps , Ann-Marie Roberts-Davis , "Age of Onset of Physical Abuse: Implications for Adult Anger and Aggression," Universal Journal of Psychology, Vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 131 - 135, 2014. DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2014.020401.

(b). APA Format:
Stephanie D. Carter , Niki L. Crabtree , James Epps , Ann-Marie Roberts-Davis (2014). Age of Onset of Physical Abuse: Implications for Adult Anger and Aggression. Universal Journal of Psychology, 2(4), 131 - 135. DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2014.020401.