Universal Journal of Agricultural Research Vol. 12(2), pp. 356 - 368
DOI: 10.13189/ujar.2024.120215
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Traditional Sibuyas (Onion) Farming in the Philippines: An Ethnographic and Biomechanical Perspective


Michael Santos 1, Jennifer de Jesus 1, Adonis Voltaire Villanueva 1, Melane Fernandez 1, Christine Saturno 2, Marimar Fuentes 1, Rayvin Pestano 1, Jumel Miller 1, Jonar Martin 1,*
1 Institute of Sports, Physical Education and Leisure Studies, College of Education, Central Luzon State University, Philippines
2 Department of English and Humanities, College of Arts and Science, Central Luzon State University, Philippines

ABSTRACT

The existing research on onion farming in the Philippines has primarily focused on its cultural and economic significance and the documentation of folk dances associated with farming culture and practices. However, there needs to be more research to understand the intricate connection between onion farming and the cultural practices and beliefs and the social dynamics that shape this agricultural practice. Furthermore, a greater understanding of the specific physical demands and movement patterns involved in onion farming is needed to provide an accurate and culturally relevant movement analysis. The study explored the cultural practices of onion farming through natural observation and immersion. Simultaneously, a biomechanical analysis uncovered the physical movements inherent in onion farming, ensuring the resulting movement analysis accurately reflects the authentic farming experience. It utilized an ethnographic approach and biomechanical analysis with 20 onion farmers who were purposively chosen. In the ethnographic phase, naturalistic observations using an observation form revealed the interaction among cultural practices, traditional agriculture, and social dynamics. Spiritual rites and traditional farming techniques, such as hand-planting and carabao plowing, bond the community to the land, preserving agriculture and culture. "Bayanihan" and group activities encourage farmers' cooperation and emotional support. Using the Mackenzie Movement Analysis Method, the biomechanical analysis identified essential movements during three crucial farming phases: Land Preparation (Panangisagana), Planting (Panangimula), and Harvesting (Panaggaapit). Shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle flexion and extension were prominent joint movements in the sagittal plane, with the main muscles of the shoulder, arm, forearm, and legs performing agonistic and antagonistic actions. This multidisciplinary study revealed the complex relationship between cultural history, sustainable agriculture, community dynamics, and biomechanics in Philippine onion cultivation. The findings of the study may provide the basis for a culturally significant folk dance on onion cultivation based on the observed movements.

KEYWORDS
Onion, Farming Practices, Traditional Farming, Biomechanical, Movement Analysis

Cite This Paper in IEEE or APA Citation Styles
(a). IEEE Format:
[1] Michael Santos , Jennifer de Jesus , Adonis Voltaire Villanueva , Melane Fernandez , Christine Saturno , Marimar Fuentes , Rayvin Pestano , Jumel Miller , Jonar Martin , "Traditional Sibuyas (Onion) Farming in the Philippines: An Ethnographic and Biomechanical Perspective," Universal Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 356 - 368, 2024. DOI: 10.13189/ujar.2024.120215.

(b). APA Format:
Michael Santos , Jennifer de Jesus , Adonis Voltaire Villanueva , Melane Fernandez , Christine Saturno , Marimar Fuentes , Rayvin Pestano , Jumel Miller , Jonar Martin (2024). Traditional Sibuyas (Onion) Farming in the Philippines: An Ethnographic and Biomechanical Perspective. Universal Journal of Agricultural Research, 12(2), 356 - 368. DOI: 10.13189/ujar.2024.120215.