Universal Journal of Agricultural Research Vol. 10(1), pp. 53 - 63
DOI: 10.13189/ujar.2022.100105
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Assessment of Prioritized Climate Smart Agricultural Practices and Technologies of Household Farmers in Southeast, Nigeria


Igberi C. O. 1,*, Osuji E. E. 1, Odo N. E. 2, Ibekwe C. C. 3, Onyemauwa C. S. 3, Obi H. O. 4, Obike K. C. 5, Obasi I. O. 5, Ifejimalu A. C. 1, Ebe F. E. 5, Ibeagwa O. B. 3, Chinaka I. C. 1, Emeka C. P. O. 1, Orji J. E. 1, Ibrahim-Olesin S. 1
1 Department of Agriculture, Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Ndufu-Alike, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
2 Department of Agricultural Economics, Management and Extension, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
3 Department of Agricultural Economics, Federal University of Technology Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
4 Department of Public and Private Law, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria
5 Department of Agricultural Economics, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Abia State, Nigeria

ABSTRACT

The study assessed prioritized climate smart agricultural (CSA) practices and technologies of household farmers in Southeast, Nigeria. A multi-stage sampling technique was used to isolate 326 household farmers who participated on the study. Data collection was done using research instrument (questionnaire). Both descriptive and inferential statistics were employed for data analysis. Results indicated that majority of the respondents were females, had secondary education, and had household size of 9 persons with a mean age of 48 years and 19 years of farming experience. Temperature variation (3.85), increase in number of sunny days (3.50), increase in amount of rainfall (3.10), variation in rainfall pattern (3.56), decrease in total rainfall (3.21), increase in frequency of heavy rains (2.85), etc were seriously perceived as climate change effects in the area. Again, various prioritized CSA practices and technologies such as growing a single crop, using a mixture of appropriately chosen genotypes of a given species (46.6%), use of quality seeds and planting materials of well-adapted crops and varieties (77.9%), crop rotation and diversity (41.1%) integrated pest management (47.5%), improved water use and management (26.4%), etc. were adopted by the farmers in mitigating climate change effects. Climate threats identified in the area include, decrease in overall productivity due to increased extreme weather events (0.97), decrease in crop production due to changes in average rainfall (0.94), decrease crop production due to increase in temperatures and rainfall variability (0.79), rapid migration of some pests and diseases (0.72), etc. Lack of access to up to-date information (2.88), access to micro-finance and insurance (2.57), access to agricultural input and output markets (2.14), etc. constrained the adoption of CSA practices. Age, education, occupation, years in farming experience further influenced the adoption of CSA practices and technologies. Policy motions in propagating climate change awareness through the mass media were recommended.

KEYWORDS
Assessment, Prioritized, Climate Change, Smart Agriculture, Practices, Technologies

Cite This Paper in IEEE or APA Citation Styles
(a). IEEE Format:
[1] Igberi C. O. , Osuji E. E. , Odo N. E. , Ibekwe C. C. , Onyemauwa C. S. , Obi H. O. , Obike K. C. , Obasi I. O. , Ifejimalu A. C. , Ebe F. E. , Ibeagwa O. B. , Chinaka I. C. , Emeka C. P. O. , Orji J. E. , Ibrahim-Olesin S. , "Assessment of Prioritized Climate Smart Agricultural Practices and Technologies of Household Farmers in Southeast, Nigeria," Universal Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 53 - 63, 2022. DOI: 10.13189/ujar.2022.100105.

(b). APA Format:
Igberi C. O. , Osuji E. E. , Odo N. E. , Ibekwe C. C. , Onyemauwa C. S. , Obi H. O. , Obike K. C. , Obasi I. O. , Ifejimalu A. C. , Ebe F. E. , Ibeagwa O. B. , Chinaka I. C. , Emeka C. P. O. , Orji J. E. , Ibrahim-Olesin S. (2022). Assessment of Prioritized Climate Smart Agricultural Practices and Technologies of Household Farmers in Southeast, Nigeria. Universal Journal of Agricultural Research, 10(1), 53 - 63. DOI: 10.13189/ujar.2022.100105.