Universal Journal of Educational Research Vol. 8(2), pp. 678 - 688
DOI: 10.13189/ujer.2020.080241
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Demographic Change and Transition in Southeast Asia: Implications for Higher Education


Muftahu Jibirin Salihu *
National Higher Education Research Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia

ABSTRACT

Demographic change and transition are proven to have significant implications for access to education as well as its demand and supply, particularly in developing countries. Consequently, this paper focuses on assessing the effects of the rapid growth of the youth population in Southeast Asia with specific attention to higher education enrolment. In conducting the study, secondary data related to the impact of demographic changes in higher education in the region were used through the review of the existing literature. As such, content analysis was employed to analyze and represent the data collected. Findings revealed that the growth of youth population can lead to increased demands in higher education enrolment and learning. It was also discovered that the expansion of higher education in Southeast Asia led to the enhancements of their higher education system that contributed to attracting more international students, thereby contributing to youth population growth. Homogeneously, the findings of the study also suggested the need for readiness from higher education institutions to cater for the increasing demands in higher education in developing countries due to continuous changes in demographic factors such as population growth. Equally, the paper proposed that the policymakers consider a transformation through modernisation of higher education act focusing on training more educators in relation to skill and entrepreneurship roles as well as making education more accessible and flexible to students.

KEYWORDS
Demography, Change, Southeast Asia, Higher Education, Population Growth

Cite this paper
Muftahu Jibirin Salihu . "Demographic Change and Transition in Southeast Asia: Implications for Higher Education." Universal Journal of Educational Research 8.2 (2020) 678 - 688. doi: 10.13189/ujer.2020.080241.