Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 6(4), pp. 433 - 446
DOI: 10.13189/sa.2018.060408
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Archaeological and Iconographic Analysis of the Use of Funerary Personal Adornments in the Middle Kingdom of Ancient Egypt


Seria Yamazaki 1,2,*
1 Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Japan
2 Graduate School of Letters, Arts and Sciences, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan

ABSTRACT

In the Middle Kingdom of Egypt (c. 2000-1650 BCE), various personal adornments were used as grave goods. This paper concentrates on the regional variability of those adornments by analyzing hundreds of tombs located in Egypt. In addition, 'ideal' assemblages and colors of personal adornments for funerary rituals will be examined through iconography such as frise d'objets, mummy masks, and anthropoid coffins. The results show that during the late Middle Kingdom, broad collars were buried with the deceased exclusively in the Memphis-Faiyum region, while single-string adornments were used everywhere. Moreover, while royal broad collars resembled images seen on the body containers, non-royal broad collars were quite different. It is apparent that the ideal personal adornments were exclusive to royalty while other personal adornments were used generally, regardless of the region, for those with either royal or non-royal status.

KEYWORDS
Ancient Egypt, Middle Kingdom, Personal Adornments, Funerary Ritual

Cite this paper
Seria Yamazaki . "Archaeological and Iconographic Analysis of the Use of Funerary Personal Adornments in the Middle Kingdom of Ancient Egypt." Sociology and Anthropology 6.4 (2018) 433 - 446. doi: 10.13189/sa.2018.060408.