Universal Journal of Psychology Vol. 2(1), pp. 5 - 15
DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2014.020102
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Codependence, Contradependence, Gender-Stereotyped Traits, Personality Dimensions, and Problem Drinking


Catherine A. Hawkins 1,*, Raymond C. Hawkins II 2
1 School of Social Work, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX , 78666,USA
2 Fielding Graduate University & Psychology Dept., University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78712, USA

ABSTRACT

This study explored the relationship between codependence assessment scales, gender, positive and negative gender-stereotyped traits, and other measures of personality and problem drinking. These instruments were administered to a sample of 208 American undergraduates. The results revealed no gender differences on the codependence measures. Students reporting a positive family history of alcohol problems scored significantly higher on codependence. Codependence was negatively correlated with socially desirable masculinity and femininity traits. Moreover, codependence was related to “Adult Children of Alcoholics” traits, shame, and vulnerability to depression [sociotropy]. Sensation seeking, negative masculinity, and problem drinking tendencies loaded on a separate factor called contradependence. These empirical findings suggest the utility of the codependence concept for further research in clinical or community settings, particularly when distinguished from contradependence.

KEYWORDS
Codependence, Contradependence, Problem Drinking, Gender-Stereotyped Traits, Sex Roles

Cite This Paper in IEEE or APA Citation Styles
(a). IEEE Format:
[1] Catherine A. Hawkins , Raymond C. Hawkins II , "Codependence, Contradependence, Gender-Stereotyped Traits, Personality Dimensions, and Problem Drinking," Universal Journal of Psychology, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 5 - 15, 2014. DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2014.020102.

(b). APA Format:
Catherine A. Hawkins , Raymond C. Hawkins II (2014). Codependence, Contradependence, Gender-Stereotyped Traits, Personality Dimensions, and Problem Drinking. Universal Journal of Psychology, 2(1), 5 - 15. DOI: 10.13189/ujp.2014.020102.